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There are alternative
sources for energy.

But there ist no
alternative for water.

Virtual water

The ecologist, Anthony Allan, of London King’s College has developed the concept of 'virtual water' for the total quantity of used to manufacture a product.

 

In brief, it is the quantity of clean water that evaporates, is consumed or is contaminated during the production of a product - from the watering of commodity crops to the water used to cool the machinery used.

 

When the 'water footprint' of various products is calculated, it reveals a much higher consumption of water than might have been thought at first sight.